Drug and Alcohol Addiction Treatment

Physical, Emotional and Spiritual Recovery

June 27, 2017
by Staff Writer
Comments Off on What Are Inhalants And Their Common Forms?

What Are Inhalants And Their Common Forms?

drug-and-alcohol-rehabWhat are inhalants?

Solvents, aerosols, and gases found in household products such as spray paints, markers, glues, and cleaning fluids; also nitrites (e.g., amyl nitrite), which are prescription medications for chest pain.

Street Names: Poppers, snappers, whippets, laughing gas

Common Forms: Paint thinners or removers, degreasers, dry-cleaning fluids, gasoline, lighter fluids, correction fluids, permanent markers, electronics cleaners and freeze sprays, glue, spray paint, hair or deodorant sprays, fabric protector sprays, aerosol computer cleaning products, vegetable oil sprays, butane lighters, propane tanks, whipped cream aerosol containers, refrigerant gases, ether, chloroform, halothane, nitrous oxide

Common Ways Taken: Inhaled through the nose or mouth

In Combination with Alcohol: Nitrites: dangerously low blood pressure.

Other Health-related Issues:

Pregnancy: low birth weight, bone problems, delayed behavioral development due to brain problems, altered metabolism and body composition.

Medications: There are no FDA-approved medications to treat inhalant addiction.

Withdrawal Symptoms: Nausea, loss of appetite, sweating, tics, problems sleeping, and mood changes.

Common treatment for inhalant addiction:

Relapse-prevention instruction
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)
Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT)
Individual therapy
Group therapy
Family therapy
12-Step education
Biofeedback & Neurofeedback
Recreation therapy

Information above is courtesy of the National Institute on Drug Abuse

www.drugabuse.gov

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Please call today to save a life from the vicious cycle of drug/alcohol addiction, as well as behavioral addictions such as gambling or sex addiction.

Florida Center for Recovery – Addiction Treatment Center: 866-910-0417

www.MyCenterForRecovery.com

Physical, Emotional and Spiritual Recovery

June 26, 2017
by Staff Writer
Comments Off on How Are Drug Disorders Categorized According To the DSM?

How Are Drug Disorders Categorized According To the DSM?

recovery-placesNIDA continues to use the term “addiction” to describe compulsive drug seeking despite negative consequences. However, “addiction” is not considered a specific diagnosis in the fifth edition of The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5)—a diagnostic manual used by clinicians that contains descriptions and symptoms of all mental disorders classified by the American Psychiatric Association (APA).

In 2013, APA updated the DSM, replacing the categories of substance abuse and substance dependence with a single category: substance use disorder. The symptoms associated with a substance use disorder fall into four major groupings: impaired control, social impairment, risky use, and pharmacological criteria (i.e., tolerance and withdrawal).

Problematic patterns of use of an intoxicating substance leading to clinically significant impairment or distress, include:

  • The substance is often taken in larger amounts or over a longer period than was intended.
  • There is a persistent desire or unsuccessful effort to cut down or control use of the substance.
  • A great deal of time is spent in activities necessary to obtain the substance, use the substance, or recover from its effects.
  • Craving, or a strong desire or urge to use the substance.
  • Recurrent use of the substance resulting in a failure to fulfill major role obligations at work, school, or home.
  • Continued use of the substance despite having persistent or recurrent social or interpersonal problems caused or exacerbated by the effects of its use.
  • Important social, occupational, or recreational activities are given up or reduced because of use of the substance.
  • Recurrent use of the substance in situations in which it is physically hazardous.
  • Use of the substance is continued despite knowledge of having a persistent or recurrent physical or psychological problem that is likely to have been caused or exacerbated by the substance.

Tolerance, as defined by either of the following:

A need for markedly increased amounts of the substance to achieve intoxication or desired effect.
A markedly diminished effect with continued use of the same amount of the substance.

Withdrawal, as manifested by either of the following:
The characteristic withdrawal syndrome for that substance (as specified in the DSM- 5 for each substance).
The substance (or a closely related substance) is taken to relieve or avoid withdrawal symptoms.

Information above is courtesy of the National Institute on Drug Abuse

www.drugabuse.gov

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Please call today to save a life from the vicious cycle of drug/alcohol addiction, as well as behavioral addictions such as gambling or sex addiction.

Florida Center for Recovery – Addiction Treatment Center: 866-910-0417

www.MyCenterForRecovery.com

Physical, Emotional and Spiritual Recovery

June 23, 2017
by Staff Writer
Comments Off on Can a Person Overdose on Cocaine?

Can a Person Overdose on Cocaine?

addiction-treatment-facilityYes, a person can overdose on cocaine. An overdose occurs when the person uses too much of a drug and has a toxic reaction that results in serious, harmful symptoms or death. An overdose can be intentional or unintentional.

Death from overdose can occur on the first use of cocaine or unexpectedly thereafter. Many people who use cocaine also drink alcohol at the same time, which is particularly risky and can lead to overdose. Others mix cocaine with heroin, another dangerous—and deadly—combination.

Some of the most frequent and severe health consequences leading to overdose involve the heart and blood vessels, including irregular heart rhythm and heart attacks, and the nerves, including seizures and strokes.

How can a cocaine overdose be treated?

Because cocaine overdose often leads to a heart attack, stroke, or seizure, first responders and emergency room doctors try to treat the overdose by treating these conditions, with the intent of:

  • restoring blood flow to the heart (heart attack)
  • restoring oxygen-rich blood supply to the affected part of the brain (stroke)
  • stopping the seizure

Information above is courtesy of the National Institute on Drug Abuse

www.drugabuse.gov

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Please call today to save a life from the vicious cycle of drug/alcohol addiction, as well as behavioral addictions such as gambling or sex addiction.

Florida Center for Recovery – Addiction Treatment Center: 866-910-0417

www.MyCenterForRecovery.com

Physical, Emotional and Spiritual Recovery

June 22, 2017
by Staff Writer
Comments Off on How Does Cocaine Use Lead To Addiction?

How Does Cocaine Use Lead To Addiction?

How does cocaine use lead to addiction?

alcohol-rehabAs with other drugs, repeated use of cocaine can cause long-term changes in the brain’s reward circuit and other brain systems, which may lead to addiction. The reward circuit eventually adapts to the excess dopamine brought on by the drug. As a result, people take stronger and more frequent doses to achieve the same high and feel relief from initial withdrawal. Withdrawal symptoms include:

  • depression
  • fatigue
  • increased appetite
  • unpleasant dreams and insomnia
  • slowed thinking

How can people get treatment for cocaine addiction?

Behavioral therapy may be used to treat cocaine addiction. Examples include:

  • cognitive-behavioral therapy
  • contingency management, or motivational incentives—providing rewards to patients who remain substance free
  • therapeutic communities—drug-free residences in which people in recovery from substance use disorders help each other to understand and change their behaviors

While no government-approved medicines are currently available to treat cocaine addiction, researchers are testing some treatments, including:

  • disulfiram (used to treat alcoholism)
  • modanifil (used to treat narcolepsy—a disorder characterized by uncontrollable episodes of deep sleep)
  • lorcaserin (used to treat obesity)

 

Information above is courtesy of the National Institute on Drug Abuse

www.drugabuse.gov

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Please call today to save a life from the vicious cycle of drug/alcohol addiction, as well as behavioral addictions such as gambling or sex addiction.

Florida Center for Recovery – Addiction Treatment Center: 866-910-0417

www.MyCenterForRecovery.com

Physical, Emotional and Spiritual Recovery

June 21, 2017
by Staff Writer
Comments Off on The Value of a Multipronged and Integrated Approach to Addiction Treatment

The Value of a Multipronged and Integrated Approach to Addiction Treatment

treatment-for-addictsDecades of research have led to today’s improved understanding of addiction as a chronic, relapsing brain disease caused by the complex interaction of genetic, social, environmental, and developmental factors. NIDA therefore recognizes the need for a whole systems approach to treating drug abuse and addiction.

Drugs of abuse alter normal brain functioning in profound and longlasting ways so that the brain can become “reengineered” to seek the drug above all else. This behavior occurs because the addicted person is conditioned to need the drug and finds it difficult, if not impossible, to resist. This dysfunctional state makes the addicted individual vulnerable to relapse triggers, even absent of conscious awareness of them.

NIDA supports multidisciplinary research addressing the multiple factors that can influence drug abuse and addiction trajectories. Research results inform treatment strategies to facilitate abstinence and prevent relapse. New findings continue to inspire development of medications and behavioral interventions to counteract drug-induced alterations in the circuits responsible for motivational, cognitive, and emotional functions. Advances come from the continued application of approaches that tap into potential benefits of the following:

• Expanding the range of drugs or populations that can be targeted with addiction medications that have already been approved.
• Developing medications for molecules and circuits affected by specific drugs, as well as for targets more generally affected by many drugs.
• Developing research-based treatments that match an addicted person’s changing needs, attitudes, and motivations over time.
• Developing medications to restore cognitive functions disrupted by addiction, which may have impeded the success of behavioral therapies.
• Weakening the power of relapse triggers.
• Taking into account the influence of comorbid conditions (e.g., mental illness, chronic pain, HIV/HCV) and genetic makeup to achieve truly customized treatments.

Information above is courtesy of the National Institute on Drug Abuse

www.drugabuse.gov

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Florida Center for Recovery – Addiction Treatment Center: 866-910-0417

www.MyCenterForRecovery.com

Physical, Emotional and Spiritual Recovery 

 

June 20, 2017
by Staff Writer
Comments Off on Developing A Gratitude Journal

Developing A Gratitude Journal

treatment-for-addictsGratitude should be thought of as a daily practice (not a one-time choice we make) for which we must actively remind ourselves to engage in. However, persistence is key, and that’s the hard part about gratitude. Human nature too often forgets to appreciate the small things in life that we take for granted – like health, family, and the simple experience of life. Gratitude is definitely an important quality to maintain while in recovery, as it allows us to be happy with what we’ve got, and not place so much unnecessary pressure on ourselves, often created from our own anxieties and over-thinking.

For that reason, there are creative ways to help maintain the healthy practice of gratitude. One of these ways is writing things you are grateful. You can use a journal, or your email, or even a clean sheet of paper that you carry with you – “Things I Am Grateful For.”

Why write them down one may ask? Because writing things down helps 1) organize your thoughts, 2) help you realize what’s really important to you, and also, 3) writing things down is found to be quite relaxing and produce a calming effect. Sitting down with a piece of paper can stop time for a bit, giving your mind a break from all external pressures. Give it a shot, you’ll be surprised the things we write down when we are seeking gratitude and appreciation.

So, what are you grateful for? Your family, job, and your recovery? Perhaps you are grateful for something as simple as having air in your lungs, that you had a nice lunch, or a clean home…whatever makes you content in life.

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Florida Center for Recovery – Addiction Treatment Center: 866-910-0417

www.MyCenterForRecovery.com

Physical, Emotional and Spiritual Recovery 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 19, 2017
by Staff Writer
Comments Off on Florida Center For Recovery – Program and Specialties

Florida Center For Recovery – Program and Specialties

addiction-treatment-facilitySince opening our doors in 2002, we have worked to provide the most effective treatment, in a nurturing environment, to help those suffering from addiction and mental health disorders recover with respect and dignity. Our campus style grounds, set on 12 beautiful acres, afford our clients a serene and private environment in which to get well. Here are a couple of programs and specialties we offer at Florida Center For Recovery:

Program and Specialties

Inpatient Detox Program

Our 18 bed detox program provides round the clock medical supervision to help alleviate the effects of withdrawal. Thanks to our expert medical team and state of the art detox unit, we are able to safely accommodate clients with varying medical diagnosis and health conditions.

Residential Program

We offer an individualized approach to treat addiction and co-occurring mental health conditions. Out multidisciplinary team has decades of experience in seeing patients through to recovery. Clients will engage in individual and group therapy, and work on relapse prevention. Each client is discharged from this program with a thorough aftercare plan, to help address any ongoing medical and/or psychiatric needs and to ensure continued support for a lasting positive outcome.

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Florida Center for Recovery – Addiction Treatment Center: 866-910-0417

www.MyCenterForRecovery.com

Physical, Emotional and Spiritual Recovery 

June 16, 2017
by Staff Writer
Comments Off on Oxycontin Drug Facts (FDA)

Oxycontin Drug Facts (FDA)

_gratitude-in-recoveryWhat is Oxycontin?

• A strong prescription pain medicine that contains an opioid (narcotic) that is used to manage pain severe enough to require daily around-the-clock, long-term treatment with an opioid, when other pain treatments such as non-opioid pain medicines or immediate-release opioid medicines do not treat your pain well enough or you cannot tolerate them.

• A long-acting (extended-release) opioid pain medicine that can put you at risk for overdose and death. Even if you take your dose correctly as prescribed you are at risk for opioid addiction, abuse, and misuse that can lead to death.

*Not for use in children less than 11 years of age and who are not already using opioid pain medicines regularly to manage pain severe enough to require daily around-the-clock long-term treatment of pain with an opioid

When taking Oxycontin:

• Do not change your dose. Take Oxycontin exactly as prescribed by your healthcare provider.

• Take your prescribed dose every 12 hours at the same time every day. Do not take more than your prescribed dose in 12 hours. If you miss a dose, take your next dose at your usual time.

• Swallow Oxycontin whole. Do not cut, break, chew, crush, dissolve, snort, or inject Oxycontin because this may cause you to overdose and die.

• Oxycontin should be taken 1 tablet at a time. Do not pre-soak, lick, or wet the tablet before placing in your mouth to avoid choking on the tablet.

• Call your healthcare provider if the dose you are taking does not control your pain.

• Do not stop taking OXYCONTIN without talking to your healthcare provider.

The possible side effects of OXYCONTIN are:

• constipation, nausea, sleepiness, vomiting, tiredness, headache, dizziness, abdominal pain,. Call your healthcare provider if you have any of these symptoms and they are severe.

Get emergency medical help if you have:

• trouble breathing, shortness of breath, fast heartbeat, chest pain, swelling of your face, tongue or throat, extreme drowsiness, light-headedness when changing positions, or you are feeling faint.

Information above is courtesy of US Department of Health And Human Services www.fda.gov

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Florida Center for Recovery – Addiction Treatment Center: 866-910-0417

www.MyCenterForRecovery.com

Physical, Emotional and Spiritual Recovery 

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